There is a major argument on Twitter Nigeria and my brother, Ose Anenih weighed in on it today. Earlier, Amara Nwankpa and Victor Asemota gave their takes.

To be honest, I’m not quite sure if I agree with those who say that the “I told you so” gang should let it go. Given the suffering in Nigeria, people need to be reminded of their hubris from six years ago. This is me speaking as someone who also made the wrong choice back then.

I’ve reflected on it a whole lot.

I don’t entirely subscribe to the ethnic agenda part of…


The fact that the government, both FG and states, don’t think that the JUSUN strike is an issue, is alarming. The implications are too many and too grievous.

I’m quoting word for word from today’s SBM newsletter.

In the first instance, the primary function of government is not merely to secure the lives and property of its constituents, but also to ensure the fair and quick adjudication of disputes between people, groups and entities. This fundamental remit is what the Nigerian state continues to fail abysmally to deliver for its people.

The result is three-fold: some resort to self-help, others…


Let me give my two kobo, and most of it is reflective…

The reality is that Buhari dares not speak to the South West, the North or the South in the condescending tone he addresses the SE and Nigeria’s youth. The man shows more deference to even Boko Haram, Bandits and other terrorists than he does to these two demographies. It shows that the South-East political class have a lot to reflect on. Why the disrespect from all sides?

The answer is simple: our political class are orphans and people like Buhari know it. …


The Sharia discussion is necessary because it shows how low the level of trust is in Nigeria. It also shows the hypocrisy of many of its proponents. How many of them will gladly, today, pack their bags and move to Zamfara, the first state to institute political Sharia in Nigeria?

It is, perhaps, a coincidence that it is this same Zamfara state that has done something this past week that bears a long discussion when the governor revoked all land titles in the state.

This is a most important story because property rights in Nigeria are insecure, and this is…


In February 2021 and again earlier in this month of May, more than 127 Civil Society Organisations joined in calling attention to the atrocity violence, lawlessness and bloodletting that have taken over all parts of Nigeria.

On those occasions, they called on the government at all levels to provide leadership in ensuring that the security and welfare of all Nigerians are preserved as enshrined in section 14 (2)(b) of the constitution. …


On Tuesday, 26 March 2019, a police Deputy Superintendent, Godwin Oshiogbuwe, was kidnapped from a checkpoint along the Ubiaja-Ewohimi-Agbor road by unknown gunmen. His body was found the next day by a police tactical team at about 1640 hours. It had been mutilated, and his gun had been taken away. To my knowledge, none of the men who found the late Oshiogbuwe has ever received any counselling. His killers have, to my knowledge, not been found.

One thing that has increasingly become a problem in Nigeria is the inability to talk through a problem, because all sorts of people, many…


I think this important story should be juxtaposed with the launch of the so-called Operation Restore Peace in the South-East. The first thing to point out before I go on is that from 2016 up until November 2020, the South East was probably the most peaceful region in the country, along with the South West. That is what the data says.


I find it instructive that two members of our elite, Atiku and Clark are warning against a potential Nigeria break up. It tells me that there’s something being said behind doors that I can’t open (yet), by Nigeria’s elite.

Here is the thing: I’ve written about the Nigerian paradox quite a bit before.

The Nigerian paradox is that we can actually be greater than the sum of our parts. However, we’ve never been equal to the sum of our parts, much less being better.

Geopolitically, it is better for the so-called minorities to remain under this umbrella because paradoxically the…


In Western countries, there is a lot of talk about de-escalation of force, risk analysis, and appropriate use of force. Many governments, even in some authoritarian countries such as China, have decided that de-escalation of force strategy ends up being “less is more”. They only use force when all else fails. Think, for example, how China has handled Hong Kong.

Let me tell a short story…

Back in 1989 when China burst into the pro-democracy riots that culminated in the Tiananmen Square massacre, the protests were spread around the country. Most people outside China don’t know this. In Beijing, Deng…

Cheta Nwanze

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